Two Years and Counting

It’s coming up on two years now, since I took over as the mid-day host at WCNY.  A lot has happened, and I thought it was probably a good time to sit down for a bit and take stock of how things are going.


Things are great!

I walk into the radio station every morning with a smile on my face.  I get to run my grubby little hands through literally hundreds of thousands of recordings, spanning more than 600 years of music, and share that with our listeners every single day!  How amazing is that?  Every time I turn on the microphone, I think of the listener who has essentially invited me into their life for a bit.  We get to share this experience of music together. 

I’m also having a blast with interviews.  I’m averaging an interview a week, many of them including performances.  (I just had the entire cast from the Syracuse Summer Theatre in the studios last week!)  I’ve talked to local and national musicians and presenters, and folks are regularly telling me how much they appreciate the time I spend with them.  I’m also running the board and co-hosting two shows with Leo Rayhill at the station, a Classic Sinatra show, and Leo Rayhill’s Sounds of Jazz.  Leo is incredible!  At nearly 90 years old, he has the most amazing collection of music and stories spanning decades of broadcasting.  It is an honor and priviledge to spend a couple of hours with him every week.

I’m getting lots of new music music in every week, and I take an hour of air time every Thursday to play from those new CDs, usually before they’ve even been entered into our database.  And my own music collection is growing by leaps and bounds, as I keep buying new pieces to use for Feminine Fusion, the weekly program highlighting the accomplishments of women in the classical music world.  It’s hard to believe that I’m just a few short weeks away from the one-year anniversary of that program.

On the compositional front, this has been a particularly good time as well.  I transcribed (with a bit of arranging) J.C. Dist, the piece by Jelle Hogenhuis for contrabass flute and flute choir.  And I got to play the solo part for the premiere with the Central New York Flute Choir – what a blast!  I also finished up “Dreamcatcher,” a trombone concerto that Haim Avitsur recorded for his newest CD release, Neue Kraft Fühlend.  I spent President’s Day skyping to Moscow for the recording session, with Ovidiu Marinescu conducting the New Russia State Symphony Orchestra.  I just got my copies of the CD about a week ago, and I am absolutely thrilled with the final product.  But the compositions don’t stop there!  I finally had my chance to expand “Woman A/Part” to a full 8-minute piece, which Trio Casals premiered last week.  That is slated to be recorded in October, and will be released next May on the Navona label on the third CD in the Moto series.  

Wait!  There’s more?  Yes, there is!  I’m currently working on a flute trio (untitled at the moment) that we expect to include on the upcoming Samba Laranja CD, due out within the next year as well.  We recorded several pieces for that CD this past spring, and will be recording the rest of it this fall.

All in all, a pretty good couple of years.  If I’m honest, though, I will admit that getting up and going to work for someone else 5 days a week is not my favorite thing to do.  I miss the flexibility of having composing be my only real commitment, and being able to stay up until the wee small hours of the morning working on music.  Frankly, balancing composing, rehearsing and performing, errands, household chores, and recreation with the time spent at the radio station can be a challenge.  But the pros definitely outweigh the cons, and I hope I can continue to lead this wonderful and very full life for many years to come.

So, dear readers, that hopefully brings you up to date on my most recent adventures.  Over the next several months I hope to highlight some of my works here, and give you some insights into how they came to be.  Keep your eyes out for that, and don’t forget to visit my website, Facebook page, or the “Buy CDs” page on this blog as well.

A Quiet Saturday Afternoon

Quiet time.  Time to think, reflect – and blog.  That’s something that’s been missing for a while.

Things at the radio station are going very well.  Just like any new endeavor, it’s taken a bit of time to settle into a routine.  Not to mention, as I get more comfortable (and folks around the office get to know me better), my responsibilities are expanding.

It’s been nearly a year since I stepped into the mid-day hosting spot on WCNY.  I’m finally comfortable enough to really call it my own now.  I’ve made a few changes, including a weekly hour of music “Fresh From the Wrapper,” where I feature works from CDs that we’ve just received in the station.  These are the newest classical music releases, some of which aren’t available for sale just yet, and I get to share them with our listeners.

Putting together a 2-hour Concert Hall every other week has been fun as well.  Morning host Bruce Paulsen and I divvy up the Concert Hall duties, hosting on alternating weeks.  It’s a great chance to present music from various venues and organizations here in Central New York, and wow, do we have some incredible talent cross our threshold!

I’m adding another responsibility at the station as well – a new program, which we hope to make available for syndication, called Feminine Fusion.  It features music created, performed, and inspired by women throughout history and into the present day.  Look for the first episode to air on WCNY in September.  It’s titled, “From Parlor … to Prize Winners” and features music composed by Clara Schumann, Libby Larsen, and more.  I’ll be providing a weekly blog update with program notes for each episode, so be sure to listen in if something piques your interest!

If you’re worried that the composition side of my world is being neglected, have no fear!  I wrote a very short work at the request of the Society for New Music based on the photography of Carrie Mae Weems.  The piece is called “Woman A/Part,” and it was premiered at the benefit gala this Spring.  There will be a repeat performance this summer at the Cazenovia Counterpoint Festival as well, and I can’t wait to hear it live.

I’m also taking a vacation from the radio station next week to put the final touches on my trombone concerto for Haim Avitsur.  My good friend Ovidiu Marinescu will be conducting the work (in Moscow in January – brrr!), and the CD will be coming out mid-2017.  I’m very excited about the piece, and I can’t wait to share it with you!

And, in true “glutton for punishment” style, I’ve picked up two new instruments for the summer.  I’m taking banjo lessons from the talented Nick Piccininni (all while enduring an endless array of banjo jokes from my friend, Bill Knowlton).  I’ve also bought an instrument I’ve wanted for some time now – a contrabass flute!  This particular flute was handmade by Jelle Hogenhuis, and I am having an absolute blast with it!  It arrived just after the CNY Flute Choir season ended, and I’m excited for the fall rehearsals to start up again.  I’ve also started working on a new flute choir piece that (fingers crossed) we can premiere next Spring.  I’ll keep you posted on that as well.

If you’ve read this far, well, thanks!  Now that we’re caught up again, I promise you’ll be getting more regular updates.  And if you have ideas or requests for my regular programming or the new Feminine Fusion show on Classic FM, drop me a note and let me know!

When Things Come Together

It’s an exciting time!  Rehearsals for the 2014-15 concert season have started, the Brazilian ensemble has had two performances in the last week, with two more scheduled for this week.  The flute choir repertoire is set after our reading session last week, and rehearsals start in earnest next week.

And CDs!

Last night I got a copy of the (nearly) final master for the upcoming Samba Laranja CD, featuring my work, Travels.  I am so privileged to have been involved not only in the recording of Travels, but in both performing and giving artistic input on the rest of the CD as well.  The last CD won a SAMMY – and honestly, this one is sounding even better.

Which has raised my excitement level for the new Trio Casals CD as well!  I’m working closely with the sound engineers at PARMA right now, to get Three Songs sounding just perfect.  (Not a difficult job, really, given the incredible performances by Trio Casals!)  Now I realize what a difference it will make when I can hear it in context with the rest of the CD.  I’m even more excited to hear the full master!

It’s also exciting – and a bit nervewracking – to watch the Indiegogo funding campaign.  With just 18 days left, I haven’t quite hit the 20% funding mark.  So here it is, another request for you to check out the campaign and make your contribution.  Then share it with your friends and family, and ask them to support it as well.

Trio Casals: Sylvia Ahramjian, violin, Anna Kislitsyna, piano, & Ovidiu Marinescu, 'cello

Trio Casals: Sylvia Ahramjian, violin, Anna Kislitsyna, piano, & Ovidiu Marinescu, ‘cello

 

Still not sure if you want to support a new and untried work?  That’s understandable.  And so I encourage you to read this article from Minnesota Public Radio.

Three Songs Re-launch

I love September.  In many ways, it feels like a re-birth to me.  Rehearsals start up again for Samba Laranja and the CNY Flute Choir.  The concert season begins in earnest for most music and arts organizations.  Days are breezy, nights are wonderfully cool, leaves are showing the first signs of turning.  It’s as though everyone and everything is pausing just enough to catch a deep breath.

Sure, August ended on a low note.  But I took my own deep breath last weekend, and now I feel re-energized and ready to push ahead once more.

That’s why I’ve launched another campaign to raise funds for my Three Songs, this time on Indiegogo.  Once again, I’m starting from scratch, but I am much more confident this time around.  I’ve learned a lot, and I expect I’ll be better able to spread the word to not only the folks who tried to back me the last time (and hopefully will renew that backing!), but to an even broader audience. 

I’ve said it before, and it’s not news – making new music available to a broad audience takes resources – monetary resources.  Recording, publishing, performers and performance spaces, publicity – all of this comes at a cost.  No matter how frugal I am, it won’t happen for free, especially considering this is much more than a simple CD release.  The enhanced CD includes extra digital content (scores, liner notes, interviews), and the whole process culminates in two live performances, one in New York and the other in Philadelphia.  Believe me, every single dollar is being stretched to its limit!

As for the actually fundraising, this time around I’m concentrating even more on sharing my music with you.  I’ve added several music videos to my Vimeo page for you.  And I’ve given you a little more insight into the inspiration behind the Three Songs in my Indiegogo video, in the hopes it will inspire you to fund these Three Songs

I’ll also be giving you more blog and Facebook entries, and I would love to hear from you with any questions or thoughts you may have.  The smallest funding level is just $1, which means our conversation can start with, “Thank you so much for your support!”

Learning How to Ask

I discovered something during my time in public radio.  I’m pretty good at begging for money!

Twice a year we had a pledge drive, and teamed up in pairs to ask our listeners to pledge their support to the station.  We had hourly goals, and almost every time, whether I was the host or the “pledge buddy,” we’d meet our goal.  Even though I’ve left the station, I still go back twice a year to help at pledge time.  At this point, I’m the only non-employee still “buddy-ing” on the air, so I must be doing something they like!

Asking for money to support someone else is surprisingly easy.  Support classical music on public radio, support cancer research, support your local animal shelter.  But what happens if I ask for money for myself?

I squirm, I apologize, I expect to be turned down.  I feel inadequate, as though I shouldn’t even be asking.

In all honesty, though, getting your music heard takes resources, and the most valuable resource is money.  As a composer, money is what allows me to fairly compensate musicians, to reserve recording space, to publish scores (or hire someone to do these things), and bring in enough income to allow me the time to compose.

This has been a good year for me so far.  I have two very different works coming out on two separate CDs, and the time I’ve spent in the recording studio on each of them has been phenomenal.

It’s also helped me learn how to ask.  I’ve always been so thrilled (and a little surprised) that anyone is performing my music, that I tend to take whatever they give me.  But this time around, I’m listening to each piece critically, and asking the performers to give me a little more of this, or a little less of that.  And I’ve discovered that it not only makes for a better performance, but strengthens the composer/musician relationship as we explore the nuances of the work together.

All of this has given me the confidence to ask just a little bit more.  While one of the CDs this year is being completely funded by the performing ensemble, the other is a collaborative work.  I’ve written a new piano trio for Trio Casals called Three Songs.  The CD is a collection of works, and is being coordinated through PARMA Recordings.  They have a team of talented people who bring so much to the table, which means it is well worth the price to bring an enhanced CD out with national distribution.  Frankly, they have much better resources, and can do far more for me than I could ever do on my own.

So, to help me cover the cost of my share, I’ve jumped in with both feet and started a Kickstarter campaign.  After asking on behalf of others for many years, I’m finally comfortable asking for myself.

There are two things in particular that I like about Kickstarter.  The first is that it’s all or nothing funding.  If the goal is met, the project is funded, and if not, well, no one will be out any money at all.  The second thing is that you’re funding something specific – full production of an enhanced CD, and two live performances.  And in return, I am able to give you something tangible – my music, in several forms.

And now, I’m asking you to help me.  Check out the Kickstarter campaign.  If you can’t contribute financially (and let’s face it, money is tight for all of us!), you can still help by spreading the word to your family and friends.

(In case you missed it earlier – here’s the link to the Kickstarter campaign.  Share and enjoy!  https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1763978672/three-songs-for-trio-casals)